MURDER IN A SMALL TOWN

President Franklin D.
FDR

MURDER IN A SMALL TOWN

CHAPTER ONE

It was the early 1940’s in our small town in  America.  The world was at war and there was a general feeling of restlessness in the Country and especially in the small towns across the United States.  It seemed that way in my town anyway, maybe because everyone knew everyone else, or at least we thought we did.  Things can change though, especially with a war raging and our boys away fighting that war.  Families who had brothers and sons in the service had the most stress of course.

Our town had changed quite a bit since the war began.  Soldiers, sailors and marines could be seen around the town now, home on leave wearing their uniforms.  More people were flying flags in their yards and we were all more patriotic.

The schools and the churches among other groups were having drives to collect aluminum cans to be used in the war effort.  There were rallies to help sell War Bonds and every family was given books of  coupons to purchase the food that was in short supply.  The amount of coupons were given to people, according to the family size.  It seemed that everyone was especially short on sugar and butter.

The movies now were all about the war, with people actually cheering in the movie houses when the Allies won a battle against the enemy.  The newsreels would come on in the movies between the main movie and the previews.  That’s the only way we actually saw some of the action in the war, the rest of the news was on the radio or in the newspapers.

At home in the evenings when FDR had his “Fireside Chats”, families were gathered around the radio listening with rapt attention.  FDR was everyone’s hero during that time, even the children loved him.  He had a spellbinding voice and he always had an uplifting message to deliver.

It was against this background that the murders in our town happened, to the shock and chagrin of all the people who lived there.  I was fourteen years old at the time and very impressionable.   I loved  mysteries, especially murder mysteries, even though they scared me.  Of course, this was not a murder mystery.  It was only too real and everyone was shocked which only added to the gossip around the town.

Marie, my older sister and I would walk three miles to the library, which was in the closest big city and then three miles back, to get our library books.  Some of the books were mandatory.  The nuns at the Catholic school we went to required us to read a few of the classics each semester along with our other reading.  So in between the murder mysteries which I loved, I managed to read a few classics.  Marie liked romantic stories, so between us we had to carry quite a few books on the way home.

We would usually have car fare for one way and then have to decide whether to actually spend it on car fare home or spend it  on a treat and end up walking back home also.   It was sometimes a hard choice because we were pretty tired by the time we were ready to go home, carrying all those books.

Marie and I got along really well.  She was a happy person always finding something to laugh about.  Where I, on the other hand was quiet (out in public) but still friendly  and we both had our own friends at school.  Little did we know that our world as we knew it was about to be shattered and not connected to the war.  It was up close and personal.  As the war raged on, our town was diverted by something we could not turn away from.

Thanks for reading.  Comments are welcome.

I have published this recently on Word Press but I am publishing it again because I will be publishing more chapters as time goes on and I wanted everyone to remember the previous chapters.

To be continued.

Elegy for Lady

LADY

LADY

She left the way she came

Quickly and without much fuss

She made her way into our hearts

Merlin, her brother and myself

She had a way about her that was

comic and endearing to me

We had many years of happiness

But alas,  the years go too fast

and Merlin left us too soon

But Lady helped me through

Although, she too was getting older and

had her aches and pains.

She decided to leave without much fuss

Now I am bereft with silence all around.

MURDER IN A SMALL TOWN

President Franklin D.
FDR

MURDER IN A SMALL TOWN

CHAPTER ONE

It was the early 1940’s in our small town in  America.  The world was at war and there was a general feeling of restlessness in the Country and especially in the small towns across the United States.  It seemed that way in my town anyway, maybe because everyone knew everyone else, or at least we thought we did.  Things can change though, especially with a war raging and our boys away fighting that war.  Families who had brothers and sons in the service had the most stress of course.

Our town had changed quite a bit since the war began.  Soldiers, sailors and marines could be seen around the town now, home on leave wearing their uniforms.  More people were flying flags in their yards and we were all more patriotic.

The schools and the churches among other groups were having drives to collect aluminum cans to be used in the war effort.  There were rallies to help sell War Bonds and every family was given books of  coupons to purchase the food that was in short supply.  The amount of coupons were given to people, according to the family size.  It seemed that everyone was especially short on sugar and butter.

The movies now were all about the war, with people actually cheering in the movie houses when the Allies won a battle against the enemy.  The newsreels would come on in the movies between the main movie and the previews.  That’s the only way we actually saw some of the action in the war, the rest of the news was on the radio or in the newspapers.

At home in the evenings when FDR had his “Fireside Chats”, families were gathered around the radio listening with rapt attention.  FDR was everyone’s hero during that time, even the children loved him.  He had a spellbinding voice and he always had an uplifting message to deliver.

It was against this background that the murders in our town happened, to the shock and chagrin of all the people who lived there.  I was fourteen years old at the time and very impressionable.   I loved  mysteries, especially murder mysteries, even though they scared me.  Of course, this was not a murder mystery.  It was only too real and everyone was shocked which only added to the gossip around the town.

Marie, my older sister and I would walk three miles to the library, which was in the closest big city and then three miles back, to get our library books.  Some of the books were mandatory.  The nuns at the Catholic school we went to required us to read a few of the classics each semester along with our other reading.  So in between the murder mysteries which I loved, I managed to read a few classics.  Marie liked romantic stories, so between us we had to carry quite a few books on the way home.

We would usually have car fare for one way and then have to decide whether to actually spend it on car fare home or spend it  on a treat and end up walking back home also.   It was sometimes a hard choice because we were pretty tired by the time we were ready to go home, carrying all those books.

Marie and I got along really well.  She was a happy person always finding something to laugh about.  Where I, on the other hand was quiet (out in public) but still friendly  and we both had our own friends at school.  Little did we know that our world as we knew it was about to be shattered and not connected to the war.  It was up close and personal.  As the war raged on, our town was diverted by something we could not turn away from.

Thanks for reading.  Comments are welcome.

I have published this recently on Word Press but I am publishing it again because I will be publishing more chapters as time goes on and I wanted everyone to remember the previous chapters.

To be continued.

THOSE WERE THE DAYS continuing story….

Grandmother/Mom
Grandmother/Mom

Mom, who was our grandmother, but insisted that her grandchildren call her mom, was a major force in my mother’s family and therefore in our family as well.  As a result of having to call her mom, we had to call my mother, mother.

When we were children, we often went to visit Mom with my mother.  She lived several blocks away and since we did not have a car, walking would have to do.  Three of mom’s daughters, she had eight, lived with her at the time.  And a few had married and had their own homes and families.  Two became teachers and the rest worked in the silk mills in the area and turned in their pay to mom as long as they were living at home.  Mom used some of the money to send two of the youngest girls to Teacher’s College.  Mom was very progressive especially being she was from the “Old Country”.

We, my sisters and I, were shy and would hide behind my mother if we were asked any questions when we visited.  Mom would comment on how bashful we were and my mother would scoff and say, “They are not that way at home!  Can’t keep them quiet there.”  Which of course, made us more bashful when we were out..

We kids enjoyed playing in mom’s large backyard where she kept chickens and had a vegetable garden.  We made up our own games and were usually pretty tired when mother would call us in for a snack of lemonade and cookies that mom had made.  Usually oatmeal and raisin cookies and the lemonade was so cool and refreshing that we guzzled it down.

After all the playing and then walking home we kids were pretty tired and usually took a nap, giving mother a brief respite and maybe a visit with her friend and neighbor, Mrs. Kelly.  Mrs. Kelly lived right next door to us and had a large yard in which were planted all manner of vegetables.  She used to give us vegetables on a regular basis, anywhere from carrots to tomatoes and onions.  My mother would make wonderful stews with chunks of meat and always potatoes added.  My mother had a small garden and even some chickens but with four children, was always grateful for donations of food especially around the holidays.

Mrs. Kelly, in addition to being very helpful to us, was also a bad influence on my mother, teaching her to smoke and sometimes drink alcohol.  But mother never became a big drinker and she never became a heavy smoker either, in spite of Mrs. Kelly.  But they did have a good time when they got together.  They both loved hearing and telling a good story.  There was always a lot of laughing when they got together.

To be continued.

Sincere: Word for Daily Post

 

 

My sister and I
My sister and I

The word for today for the Daily Post today is sincere.

I really can’t think of anything to write, especially about this word.  Guess I am kind of blocked!  I haven’t been doing much writing for quite some time but recently I set up a special tablet dedicated to Creative Writing.

Since I already do what I call the A.M. notes of daily events and thoughts, I needed another tablet just for writing for my Blog.  So I am getting there, also have had a story that’s been percolating in my brain for a long time now, years at least.  About two weeks ago I actually started putting the story into writing.  I think it is definitely going to be an interesting story and it is based on true events that happened in the small town where I grew up. It involves a murder that happened in the town which was very sensational.  Also, it was during the time when WWII was raging.  I have been meaning to write this story for a long time and the participants are old now or dead so it will be kind of difficult to get specific details.

I have done a lot of research but there is still a lot more that needs to be done.  Especially since this happened so long ago and details are pretty fuzzy.  In fact, one of my cousins told me he did not think I should write about it.  But of course, I will not take his advice.  Anyway, let me know what you think? Should I go ahead with my research and follow through with this dramatic story or leave it alone and pursue another storyline altogether?

Thanks for your interest and comments.

 

 

MY CAT LADY

LADY TAKING A BREAK
LADY TAKING A BREAK

I thought since it is National Cat’s Day I would write a poem about my cat, Lady.  She is quite the character, with a mind of her own and set in her ways, not unlike myself!  So I am going to write a poem which hopefully does her justice.

LADY

There once was a cat name of Lady

She loved lying in the sun

But not where it was shady.

Cleaning her plate, she’d find her spot

Which was of course most comfy

Under her blanket right on the dot.

Snoozing away ’till the clock struck two

Up she’d pop, for her next meal

Lapped it up, ’till next one was due.